GOOMPI UGERABAH, ABORIGINAL ARTWORK FRAMED IN A BLACK FLOATING FRAME

GOOMPI UGERABAH ABORIGINAL ARTWORK FRAMED. Discover more about the Aboriginal artist: Goompi and peruse some of the Goompi Ugerabah aboriginal artworks we have framed in floating black frames here at Dawsons Framing on the Gold Coast.

 

From the Artist’s Website:

Goompi Ugerabah

Aka Stephen Larcombe.

Goompi is a world renowned Aboriginal artist and also the song man of world renowned Aboriginal dance troupe Bundjalung Kunjiel.

Representing stories via artworks of his birthplace and home on Kombumerri tribal land (Gold Coast). And the neighbouring

Minjungbal Tribal land (Tweed Heads) where he also grew up.

And song and dance of his skin fathers and teachers “the Walker brothers” who are Nunukal people of North Stradbroke Island Qld.

Bora Rings by artist: GOOMPI UGERABAH, ABORIGINAL ARTWORK FRAMED IN A BLACK FLOATING FRAME
Bora Rings by artist: GOOMPI UGERABAH, ABORIGINAL ARTWORK FRAMED IN A BLACK FLOATING FRAME

ABORIGINAL ART IN A FLOATING FRAME

From the Artist’s Website:

Goompi meaning possum, is a descendant of the Gurreng Gurreng people in the Bundaberg region of Qld.

Born as Stephen Larcombe in 1981 on the Gold Coast, which is tribally known as ‘Kombemerri’ land.

Living on the Gold Coast and in Tweed Heads, NSW all his life to date.

Goompi began to paint at the age of 25, after learning and practicing culture through song and dance in his early teens. The song and dance was taught to him by his teachers and skin fathers (the Walker brothers) who are Nunukal people of Stradbroke Island, Qld.

Goompi was self taught as an artist by understanding different techniques from watching other Aboriginal artists from around Australia. Using dot formations to create imagery of native animals in his area.

Dawsons Framing Canvas Stretching and Float framing. Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.
Dawsons Framing Canvas Stretching and Float framing. Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.

 

Realising he had creative skill, Goompi took the initiative to quickly form his own style, making sure it was unique and unlike any other artist. Transitioning to abstract he represented his stories with larger dots in black, grey and white colour tones. These colours being similar to ochres found in his area.

This attracted attention rather quickly of many different collectors and galleries within Australia.

Over the years using acrylics he has updated his style by adding sandy  colour tones to his works to maintain a saltwater feel which represents his birthplace. In some rare works Goompi has also used brighter colours to represent the rainforest and freshwater areas of his home land.

Goompi creates works that are highly sought after and acquired by collectors from all around the world.

Most of his exhibitions are in hand selected galleries within Australia and the open nights are always a hit. Goompi and his tribal dance troupe presents a display of singing, didgeridoo and dancing. Outlining that song and dance is the same as “Aboriginal art”. The two ways are methods Aboriginal people used to tell their stories since time began.

Dawsons Framing Canvas Stretching and Float framing. Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.
DETAIL: Dawsons Framing Canvas Stretching and Float framing. Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.

 

Exhibiting overseas is at the top of Goompi’s list after already doing so in Romania and France, these opportunities have sparked his passion to travel and showcase his cultural stories and art works to the world.

Goompi has sold out numerous exhibitions and is achieving more accolades every year as he continues in the art industry.

So it’s no wonder he receives titles such as “One of Australia’s leading Indigenous artist of today”.

 

Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.
Aboriginal Artwork framed in a black floating frame, by Goompi Ugerabah.

 

Aboriginal art refers to the artistic traditions and creations of the Indigenous peoples of Australia, who have a rich cultural heritage spanning thousands of years. This art form is deeply rooted in the spiritual and cultural beliefs of these diverse communities and is characterized by its unique visual language, symbolism, and connection to the land. Aboriginal art encompasses a wide range of artistic expressions, including painting, sculpture, carving, weaving, and more.

Key characteristics of Aboriginal art include:

  1. Dreamtime Stories and Creation Myths: Aboriginal art often depicts Dreamtime stories and creation myths that explain the origins of the world, landscapes, animals, and humans. These stories are integral to Aboriginal spirituality and are passed down through generations.
  2. Symbolism and Iconography: Aboriginal art is rich in symbolism and iconography, with intricate patterns, dots, lines, and shapes carrying deep cultural meanings. These symbols are used to convey spiritual concepts, geographical features, and important cultural teachings.
  3. Connection to the Land: The relationship between Aboriginal people and their ancestral lands is a central theme in their art. Artworks frequently portray the land, its features, and the spiritual connection Aboriginal people have with it.
  4. Use of Natural Pigments: Traditionally, natural pigments sourced from the environment, such as ochre, charcoal, and clay, were used to create Aboriginal artworks. These pigments are often mixed with various mediums to produce vibrant and earthy colors.
  5. Dot Painting: Dot painting is one of the most well-known styles of Aboriginal art. It involves intricate patterns of dots to create images that represent landscapes, animals, and stories. Each dot can have its own significance and meaning.
  6. Cross-Hatching and Line Work: Cross-hatching, where lines intersect at various angles, is another common technique used in Aboriginal art. It adds depth and texture to the artwork and is often seen in depictions of animals, people, and objects.
  7. Regional Diversity: Aboriginal art varies greatly across different regions of Australia, with each community having its own unique style, techniques, and themes. These differences reflect the distinct cultures and histories of various Aboriginal groups.
  8. Contemporary Expressions: While traditional techniques and themes remain vital, Aboriginal artists also explore contemporary forms of expression, often blending traditional practices with modern materials and styles. This allows for a dynamic evolution of Aboriginal art.
  9. Ceremonial and Ritual Use: Many Aboriginal artworks are created for ceremonial and ritual purposes, often involving dance, song, and storytelling. These art forms play a central role in connecting individuals to their cultural heritage.

Aboriginal art is not only visually striking but also deeply meaningful, serving as a bridge between past, present, and future for Indigenous communities. It has gained international recognition for its cultural significance and artistic excellence, with both traditional and contemporary Aboriginal artists contributing to its enduring legacy.

Artwork by Aboriginal Artist Goompi Ugerabah: Local Gold Coast Indigenous Artwork framed at Dawsons Framing.
Artwork by Aboriginal Artist Goompi Ugerabah: Local Gold Coast Indigenous Artwork framed at Dawsons Framing.

Contact us is you require framing for an original Aboriginal Artwork. We treat all our works with the utmost respect and care.