SMITH FAMILY COAT OF ARMS AND FAMILY CREED FRAMED

SMITH COAT OF ARMS AND FAMILY CREED FRAMED

Take a look at the framing of this special piece of family heritage for our client. We wanted to create a framed piece that was unique and drew on various elements inside the coat of arms in the framing.
  • Red and Gold Matting with a custom tartan fabric matboard to replica the colours and heritage in the design
  • Side by side layout
  • Aged dark gold scoop framing with a dark scooped fillet to add nostalgia and a significance.
  • The two frames mirror the design, however, they swap the red fabric matboard and the tartan fabric matboard

*sample frame design

MCCALLUM COAT OF ARMS AND FAMILY CREED FRAMED
MCCALLUM COAT OF ARMS AND FAMILY CREED FRAMED

SMITH COAT OF ARMS AND FAMILY CREED FRAMED

Smith is an Anglo-Saxon name, originally associated with blacksmiths. It comes from the Old English word “smid,” meaning “to strike with a hammer.” Given the importance of metalworking in medieval times, Smith and its variations are widespread throughout the British Isles and Europe. However, it’s unclear why blacksmiths’ surname is so populous, considering that other professions, like farming, were more common. The origins of the Smith family can be traced back to Durham in the 10th century. The name also has connections to Essex, Warwickshire, and Cornwall. Throughout history, Smith has had various spelling variations, including Smyth and Smythe.

The Smith Motto

Originally serving as a war cry or slogan, mottoes started appearing alongside coats of arms in the 14th and 15th centuries. However, they didn’t become common until the 17th century. As a result, older coats of arms often lack a motto. In heraldry, mottoes are typically optional and subject to personal choice, and many families have opted not to include one in their coat of arms.

Surname:  Smith
Branch:  Smith
Origins:  Scottish
More Info:  Scotland

Background:  The name Smith comes from the metalsmiths, blacksmiths, bladesmiths, silversmiths, goldsmiths, and other workers in metal who supplied all of Scotland with swords, dirks, sgian dubhs, jewelry, spears, buckles, armour, and most anything else made of metal. Although the Gaelic name for Smith is Gow, Gowan, or MacGowan, the anglicized form of the name has been used in Scotland since the twelfth century. Today Smith is the most common name in Scotland.

The ubiquity of Smiths in Scotland can be traced back to its origins. While the earliest recorded use of Smith as a surname in Scotland dates to 1398 in Aberdeen, it’s believed that most Scottish Smiths are descendants of the Picts, an ancient tribe in Scottish history.

Though Smith is commonly associated with blacksmiths, it’s suggested that during the establishment of surnames by British law in Scotland, various families adopted the name, regardless of their profession. Smith is a classic example of a polygenetic surname, originating in different locations and adopted independently by different families.

The Picts, a founding race in the British Isles, arrived in Scotland from Brittany around 5th century B.C. King Nechtan was one of the Pictish monarchs in 724 A.D. They inhabited an eastern territory from Aberdeen to Edinburgh and were later invaded by Orcadian Vikings from the north.

Historical documents like the Inquisitio, the Black Book of the Exchequer, and others were used to research the Smith surname, which was found in northern England and Scotland with ancient family ties.

The origins of the Smith name are thought to stem from Neil Cromb, the son of Murdoch, Chief of the Clan Chattan, in 1150. The name has various spellings, including Smith, Smyth, and Smythe, with changes occurring even between generations. The name Smith spread to the midlands of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Historians are puzzled by the surname’s link to trade names like Shoesmith, Shearsmith, and Whitesmith, and its association with hotel anonymity. The name Smith has consistently proliferated over the centuries, with an annual increase of 35 to 40% compared to the general population’s 5 to 10%.

Despite its presumed association with blacksmiths, the prevalence of the Smith surname challenges expectations. Even in 1853, Smiths continued to multiply at a 38% rate.

 

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